Data Analysis on Multisensory space for international week celebration in Laurea UAS, Finland

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Data Analysis on Multisensory space for an international week we celebration in Laurea UAS, Finland.

  • Introduction

According to Pallasmaa (2014), during one’s spatial experience, the most overwhelmingly perceived character of the built environment is the atmosphere. An atmosphere is simultaneously influenced by the perception of various sensory dimensions of a space, i.e., not only visual, but also haptic and audible ones. Therefore, it makes one of the key spatial characteristics that influences the affective mental image of a place in people’s minds (Hasse, 2016). This paper presents an analysis of a feedback gathered from participants who visited the multisensory space during the international week celebration in Laurea University of Applied Sciences, Finland.

  • Methodology

A questionnaire was designed to collect people’s opinions on multisensory space designed for participants to show the various cultures of countries of students behind the space. Apart from the questions concerning interviewees’ sociodemographic data, including country of origin, age and gender, five main questions were included in the questionnaire.

To maximize the validity of the collected data about interviewees’ sensory perceptions, in regard to their possible causal connections to evaluations of affective city image, it was important to make sure that interviewees were able to provide answers based on their experiences regarding the space that contribute very much to the affective city image of Accra, lappeenranta and a beach side in their minds. The survey on the Multisensory Space designed to represent cities of countries like Ghana and Finland was conducted online. Respondnets were made to scan a quick response (QR) code to give their voluntory feedback of the space. A total of fifteen respondents took part in this study. Below is the outcome of the survey

  • Results and Discussion

The questionnaire was divided into two main parts. The first, was the five major questions with two opended ones and the second was the sociodemographic data of respondents. This part of the report will start with the background data of respondnets.

Sociodemographic data of Respondents

This section was included in the study to find out about the country of origin, age and gender of respondents participating in the week celebration.

Country of Origin

Fig, 1 country of origin.

The figure 1 above represent the outcome of the coutry of origin of participants of the programme. It can be seen that majority who took part in this study were citizens of Finland representing 79%. This was followed by participants from Denmark (DK) with 14%. The last group representing 7% were from Lithuania. From the outcome, it can be concluded that, the host nation being Finland were the majority to have participarted in this study.

Gender Distribution

Gender was included in the survey to ascertained the number of male and female respondents for the study.

Fig, 2 Gender Distribution

Data obtained from the survey suggested that 87% of the respondents were female while male represented 13%. This stands to reason that the percentage of female respondents for the study is higher than males. Also, the implication of this large percentage of female respondents is indicative of the fact that females are people who are known to be mostly wanting to enjoy peaceful and calm atmosphere everytime than males.

Age Distribution

The ages of respondents were studied to inform on the number of the respondents who visited the space during the international day. The ages were stated under 18 years to 60 plus.

Fig, 3 Age Distribution

The fig, 3 above presents the age distribution of respondents of the study. This shows that the age bracket of 30-59 were the majority of respondents who took part in this study. This group represents 53% while 60 plus recorded 33%. It is also obeserved that, no respondent was under 18 years. The respondnets within the age bracket of 18-29 were 13% representing the minority. It can be concluded base on the findings that, respondents within 30-59 years were the most people who visited the multisensory space.

  • Multisensory space as Interesting

Respondents of the study were asked to indicate as to whether they fully agree or disagree with various statements in connection with the creation of the space. The first of the statement was to find out if the respondents found the space interesting. The outcome is illustrated on the fig, 4 below;

Fig, 4 Multisensory space as Interesting

The fig, 4 above presents the outcome of the study. It is observed that majority of the respondents representing 87% fully agreed that, the space was an interesting one while no respondent disagreed to the statement. Meanwhile 13% were of the view that, the space was somewhat interesting and as a result, indicated somewhat agree as an answer. Based on this, it can be concluded that, the space was an interesting one and could be created anywhere for learning and relaxation.

  • I enjoyed the visit in the multisensory space

As part of the objectives to improve the creation of the multisensory space, respondents were asked to indicate if they enjoyed their visit at the space during the international week. The results regarding this statement is illustrated on the fig, 5 below;

Fig, 5 I enjoyed the visit in the multisensory space

The outcome on the fig, 5 above clarely indicate that respondents fully agree that, they enjoyed their visit to the multisensory space. This was represented by 100% of the respondents. None of the respondents for the study held a contra view to this ascertion. Therefore, it can be concluded that, every individual who visited the space one way or the other, enjoyed the visit to the multisensory space.

  • Enough information about the multisensory space method

In other to ascertained if respondents got enough information about the method for the space, they were asked to indicate if they agreed or disagreed to the statement. The outcome is presented on the fig, 6 below;

Fig, 6 Enough information about the method

Considering the fig,6 above, it can be observed that, 53% of the respondents representing the majority partially disagree while 33% fully agree that, they got enough information about the method. It can be concluded that, there wasn’t enough information about the method.

  • Enough information about other culture

This part of the study seeks to find out if respondnets received enough information regarding other cultures exibited on the day. The outcome is represented on the fig, 7 below;

Fig, 7 information about other culture

From the analysis made, it was discovered that majority of repondnets (60%) who visited the space indicated somewhat agree as an answer to the question asked. This means that, they somewhat believe that, they got enough information about other cultures from the space. Meanwhile, 40% fully agreed or admitted that they got enough information about other cultures. No respondent disagreed to the question. One can therefore conclude that, there was enough information about other cultures.

  • The application of the method

This question was asked to find out if repsondents could apply the method they have learnt at the space in their own institution. The outcome is illustrated on the fig, 8 below;

Fig, 8 the application of the method

From the fig, 8 above, 80% representing the majority of respondents fully agreed that the application of the method at their own institutions is possible while none of them fully disagreed to the statement. It is also observed that 13% indicated somewhat agree as a response to the question. Meanwhile, 7% were not sure if they could apply the method or not. It therefore convincing to state that, participants will be able to apply the method in their own institutions.

  • Good things respondents appriciated

A question of what you like about the space was asked and the following were given by respondents. First of these were the atmosphere, Creativity, Multisensory-aspect: sounds, smells and textures brings another level to the experience. Peace and quite atmosphere Sharing cultural issues and experience as well as the silence nature of the atmosphere. The aesthetics and the quietness, place for mindfulness. ‘We Are dicussing how it can be applied in our Academy in Denmark’. Respondents alo admired the relaxed feeling of the place.

Conclusion

This report introduces and stresses the significance of multisensory experiences in perceiving the overall impression of a space, i.e., atmosphere, and in shaping the affective city image and the behavioural intention. It offers a broader view on the methods adopted, how these methods could be applied in other places and how other information of other culture is represented.

It is therefore established that, most individuals who visited the space were Finnish by nationality, mojority of which are female within the age group of 30-59 years. The space was found interesting and every individual who visited the space one way or the other, enjoyed the visit to the multisensory space. Finally, the study also concluded that, there wasn’t enough information about the method but there was enough information about other cultures and this made the space an interesting one.

Recommendation

Base on the outcome of the study, the following suggestions are made;

  • Enough information regarding the methodology adopted for the space should be provided snd displayed openly for participants consideration,
  • Also Concrete examples on how it has been used and what have been or could be achieved using the method could be provided.
  • Something to eat and drink could also be provided next time.

Analysis by:

Dominic P. Gyeyin

Student

Laurea University of Applied Sciences,

Finland, Espoo.

Referrence

Pallasmaa, J., 2014. Space, place and atmosphere. Emotion and peripherical perception

in architectural experience. In: Lebenswelt. Aesthetics and Philosophy of Experience, Vol. 4.

Hasse, J., 2016. Traffic architecture: hidden affections. In: Bille, M., Sorensen, T.F. (Eds.), Elements of Architecture: Assembling Archaeology, Atmosphere and the Performance of Building Spaces. Routledge, Oxon.

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